What does the Sheriff do?

The duties of the office of county sheriff in Arkansas are divided into 3 major areas.

The sheriff is the chief enforcement officer of the courts, conservator of the peace in the county, and has custody of the county jail. The Arkansas Constitution states (Ark. Const. Art. 7, Sec. 46) that each county shall elect one sheriff, who shall be the ex-officio collector of taxes, unless otherwise provided by law.

As chief enforcement officer of the circuit and chancery courts, the sheriff is charged by the constitution and by statute with the execution of summonses, enforcement of judgments, orders, injunctions, garnishments, attachments, and the making of arrest on warrants issued by the courts. The sheriff also opens and attends each term of circuit and chancery court and notifies residents selected to jury duty, assists in handling witnesses and prisoners during a given court term.

A second major area of duties surrounds the responsibility of the sheriff in law enforcement (ACA 14-15-501). The responsibility in this area is very broad and includes the preservation of the public peace; the protection of life and property; the prevention, detection, and investigation of criminal activity; the apprehension and confinement of offenders and the recovery of property; the control of crowds at public events; the control of vehicular traffic and the investigation of traffic accidents; and the rendering of services and the protection of property during civil emergencies or natural disasters.

The responsibility for the custody of the county jail in each county is given to the county sheriff (ACA 12-41-502). The sheriff has custody of accused felons and some misdemeanors apprehended in the county and is charged with feeding and keeping these accused persons. A log of all prisoners kept in the county jail and those transferred is maintained by the sheriff, as well as a bail bond book. – Association of Arkansas Counties

 

When can I visit a detainee?

Visitation must be scheduled at least 2 days in advance, but no more than 9 days ahead of the visit.

Schedule a visitation